D_Property

It’s been a roller coaster over the last twelve months for Britain. And it may remain one, at least for some parts of country. Investors, however, seem to not mind any of it too much.

In less than one year the UK has managed to reinvent investment property taxation, decide to leave the EU, change head of state, start its departure from the EU and call for a new election.

It might therefore be safe to say there’s a lot going on in Britain at the moment.

For investors, some of these changes bring long-lasting effects with them that may affect their financial strategies significantly for some time to come.

With the election campaign now under way (although, bear in mind only for another seven weeks), one of the biggest questions is how central the UK’s housing market will be in an election that seems to be consumed by old Brexit-grudges and new agenda-enemies.

And whilst experts were quick to speak up and announce that housing needs to be a key point in any discussion about the country’s future, the even stronger indicator for this are probably investors and consumers themselves.

A new research has found that 2.21 million investors across Britain have started 2017 with a bigger appetite for risk. They’re seeking new ways to invest, and they’re aiming to do so in the long-term.

The election itself is forecast to only have very little impact on the single investor and the continued strength of the UK’s property market. This estimate appears bold at first, but becomes more realistic when put into context.

Over recent years, the UK has experienced at least three major political changes that could have impacted the property market negatively: Scotland’s Independence Referendum in 2014, the changes announced to Stamp Duty charges in 2015 (and it coming into effect in 2016) and the EU Referendum in 2016.

Three major events. And whilst some may argue that some of the events were bigger than others, they all have one thing in common: investor interest remained stable.

So if we only were to look back to find out how investors will deal with the snap General Election, one could quickly jump to one conclusion: nothing will change. And they’re right to think so. At least to some extend.

What they might also have to bear in mind, however, is that what lies ahead of us, a possible change in the way Britain is governed – and therefore how the country does business – could be a big change. And it means that there are probably more political and economical twists waiting for the country’s investors over the next couple of years.

However, if there is anything we should definitely learn from recent history, it’s that there are always opportunities for investors, they just ought to be managed timely and strategically.

Source: www.buyassociation.co.uk

April 26, 2017
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How Theresa May’s General Election will impact the Investor

It’s been a roller coaster over the last twelve months for Britain. And it may remain one, at least for some parts of country. Investors, however, seem to not mind any of it too much. In less than one year the UK has managed to reinvent investment property taxation, decide to leave the EU, change head of state, start its departure from the EU and call for a new election. It might therefore be safe to say there’s a lot going on in Britain at the moment. For investors, some of these changes bring long-lasting effects with them that may affect their financial strategies significantly for some time to come. With the election campaign now under…
April 26, 2017
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Brexit has affected younger buyers in the UK, but majority not deterred

Younger home buyers in the UK have postponed an upcoming property purchase due to concerns over the strength of the country’s post Brexit economy, a new survey has found. Some 63% of 18 to 24 year olds revealed that they have reconsidered buying a home due to losing faith in the economic outlook when the country leaves the European Union, according to the poll commissioned by property consultants Cluttons. The OnePoll survey also found that older people were not as concerned with 82.07% of those aged 55 saying that the Brexit decision hasn’t impacted their property purchase intensions at all. At a regional level, people in Oxford were the most concerned with the impact of a…
April 25, 2017
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Asking prices hit record high in England and Wales despite growth slowing

Asking prices in England and Wales hit a record high £313,655 in April while the housing market recorded the best sales figures since 2007, according to the latest index figures. Overall the price of property coming to market increased by 1.1% or £3,547 last month and is up 2.2% year on year, the figures from property portal Rightmove shows. Although lower than the average increase of 1.6% at this time of year over the past seven years and with the annual pace now the lowest for four years, average asking prices still reached a new high. Rightmove says that first time buyers are driving growth, up 6.5% annually to new record of £194,881 and there is…
April 25, 2017
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Is renting becoming a long-term solution?

Owning a home remains the dream of most Brits, but with prices constantly increasing and the supply shortage ever presented, is it maybe time to change that dream? For many Londoners, the idea of owning a home sounds amazing, and very far out of reach. The average house price in the capital sits somewhere around £800,000, the average annual salary is far from it, at around £40,000. And although this is a rather drastic example, things aren’t looking an awful brighter throughout the rest of the country. Britain’s housing affordability is low, no matter of the region you’re looking at. Apart from those who might be inheriting a respectable sum or who know they can bank…
April 24, 2017
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Average rents for new tenancies in UK up just 1.1% year on year

Average rents in the UK continue to see a slower rate of rental growth in March compared to last year with values for new tenancies up just 1.1% nationally. But there is some regional variation with asking rents up 3.1% year in year in Wales, up 1.5% in Northern Ireland and up 1.2% in Scotland. Overall the national average was £904 per calendar month. In Wales it was £616 in March, in Northern Ireland £614 and in Scotland £610, according to the latest index from HomeLet. But the highest rents are in London at £1,546 per calendar month, up 1.2% compared to March 2016. However, since July 2016 rents in London have seen a slower pace…
April 20, 2017
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Has stability arrived in the mortgage market?

Recent analysis from Mortgage Brain has shown that the cost of most mainstream mortgages continues to show signs of stabilisation due to little movement seen in the market over the past three months. According to the report, the cost of the lowest rate five year fixed mortgage (2.55%) with a 90% LTV, for example, fell by just 1% since the start of January 2017. The cost of a 60% LTV two year fixed is also just 1% cheaper than it was at the start of the year, while a 90% LTV two and three year fixed and a 60% LTV five year fixed are all just 0.2% cheaper than they were three months ago. By comparison,…
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