D_Property

The majority of landlords in the UK believe they will be affected by the new tougher mortgage affordability tests and by income tax changes due to be introduced in April of this year.

Some 60% said they believe they will be directly affected by income tax relief changes but 29% said that they would not, according to the latest property investor survey from Mortgages for Business.

It is thought that these landlords are predominantly likely to be a mix of basic rate income tax payers and landlords who operate their portfolios through limited company vehicles which are subject to corporation tax.

And some 11% said that they still did not know if the changes would affect them directly and there is a suggestion that some might not yet fully understand the implication of changes being introduced in 2017.

‘We are still encouraging landlords who haven’t already taken professional advice on the matter to do so as soon as possible as some may find that the new formula will tip them into the next tax bracket leaving them worse off. The new regime starts in April, so there’s not much time left to make strategic decisions and take action,’ said David Whittaker, chief executive officer of Mortgages for Business.

‘It has certainly been a tough 18 months or so for landlords, so it’s encouraging to learn that the majority are getting to grips with changes that will dramatically alter the way they operate,’ he added.

The survey also found that 60% believe that they understand the impact of the new Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) guidelines on buy to let lending and 25% said they partially understood the implications of the changes to borrowing criteria.

The changes mean that buy to let lenders have been obliged to tighten their affordability calculations in recognition of the increased tax burden being imposed on landlords borrowing personally.

However Whittaker said it is worrying that 9% of respondents did not know how the revised affordability calculations would affect how much they could borrow and 6% were completely unaware of the new guidelines, despite wide media coverage on the topic.

With tax changes due to take effect in April, landlords are continuing to move toward incorporation, with 32% of respondents owning at least one property in a limited company, up 2% on May 2016.

This suggests that landlords are thinking seriously about how to adapt to market changes and maximise their returns, although it is portfolio landlords, those who own four or more mortgaged properties, who lead the a way in this regard.

When asked whether future purchases would be made personally or using a limited company, 54% opted for the just incorporated route and 16% said they would use both. The remainder was split down the middle between those who said they would continue to borrow personally and those who had yet to decide how to proceed.

Five year fixed rate mortgages were found to be the most popular product type over all with 34% of respondents expressing a preference for this category of loan, a tremendous return to form after falling popularity in previous surveys.

The firm says that this is clear evidence that lenders’ focus on competitive pricing of five year fixed rates has been successful in attracting landlords keen to maintain some certainty of cash flow following a year of economic turbulence and growing speculation that interest rates and inflation will rise next year.

Despite a tougher operating environment, the proportion of landlords seeking to expand their portfolios rose to 45%, up from 41% in May 2016. This suggests that most are willing to absorb the increased costs, adapt strategies and remain in the property investment market, which still provides better returns than most alternative asset classes.

Source: www.propertywire.com

January 3, 2017
home-1738408_1920

Tougher lending criteria and tax change set to affect majority of UK landlords

The majority of landlords in the UK believe they will be affected by the new tougher mortgage affordability tests and by income tax changes due to be introduced in April of this year. Some 60% said they believe they will be directly affected by income tax relief changes but 29% said that they would not, according to the latest property investor survey from Mortgages for Business. It is thought that these landlords are predominantly likely to be a mix of basic rate income tax payers and landlords who operate their portfolios through limited company vehicles which are subject to corporation tax. And some 11% said that they still did not know if the changes would affect…
December 23, 2016
bank-20795_1920

Stamp duty’s effect on Britain’s property market

Last year, a good friend sold her house in central London and moved to the country. I chivvied her all the way. Every time there were hints of backsliding – she worried about schools, about getting the right kind of coffee, about not having close next-door neighbours and the like – I called and nagged. I showed her charts of the ratio between London and non-London house prices, explained that the gap was at a historical high and that if she wanted to make the best possible London-for-not-London trade, 2015 was likely to be the best possible time to do it. Her house didn’t sell as fast as she expected (the turn was already beginning). But…
December 23, 2016
castle-1374916_1920

Value of UK housing stock went up by 7% in 2016, to £8.17tn

The average British property has increased in value by £56.67 a day in 2016, Zoopla has revealed. The overall value of the UK’s 28.9 million homes has risen by more than 7% in 2016 to a total added value of £8.17tn, a new research has revealed. The year’s biggest winner is, according to Zoopla’s study, Diss, a market town in Norfolk with an increase of 16.2%. Zoopla analysed all their price data between 1 January and 7 December 2016 and came to the conclusion that Britain’s housing stock now has got an overall value of £8,165,502,086,907. This is an increase of £559bn since January. When it comes to regions, the report states that England’s East has…
December 23, 2016
house-1723353_1920

A property’s condition is very important to over half of tenants in the UK

The condition of a rental property is the most important consideration for new tenants in the UK private rental sector, followed by the quality of the landlords and a value for money rent. Research shows that 52% of tenants believe that the state of the home they are renting is extremely important while 46% say having a good landlords is equally important. Some 45% want value for money when renting a home in the UK and location is extremely important for 38%, according to new research from agents Your Move.
December 23, 2016
animals-731213_1920

Former home of PMs and 007s named UK’s most expensive street

A London square whose wealthy residents have included Margaret Thatcher and Sean Connery has been crowned the most expensive in England and Wales with an average house price of nearly £17m. Eaton Square, in the upmarket Belgravia district of west London, topped a list dominated by addresses in the capital, according to an annual survey by Lloyds Bank.
December 23, 2016
houses-1150022_1920

Research reveals best investment spots for buy to let landlords in UK

Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, London and Cardiff are the best locations in the UK for residential rental investment and are cities with strong tenant demand, according to new research. They all score over 45 in a new investor growth assessment tool developed by national lettings and property franchise business Martin & Co. Cambridge also scores highly due to having a significant population of young professionals and growing support for the proposed Cambridge-Milton Keynes-Oxford corridor. Less obvious investor destinations for buy to let landlords include Aylesbury and central Bedfordshire which score the maximum seven for development. Both have witnessed a 5% increase in housing stock since 2011 and both have a substantial development pipeline. The analysis report also…
Restricted Content
The contents of this website are intended only for investors from certain qualifying classes (“High Net Worth Individuals”, “Self-Certified Sophisticated Investors” and “Restricted Investors”). To access the full contents of the site you must first register in one of these categories.
Please confirm that you are a suitable investor before proceeding. If you are unsure whether you meet the specific criteria or not, you can check the definitions here.
Will be back soon